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In this intimate and moving graphic memoir, Teresa Wong writes and illustrates the story of her struggle with postpartum depression in the form of a letter to her daughter Scarlet. Equal parts heartbreaking and funny, Dear Scarlet perfectly captures the quiet desperation of those suffering from PPD and the profound feelings of inadequacy and loss.

IN BOOKSTORES AND ONLINE

CANADA
Amazon.ca | Indigo | Arsenal Pulp Press

U.S.
Amazon.com | Barnes & Noble | Indiebound


DEAR SCARLET IN THE NEWS


PRAISE FOR DEAR SCARLET

“This raw but reassuring memoir filled with helpful suggestions to mothers struggling with similar situations and feelings is sure to resonate with many new parents.”
— Publishers Weekly
“The rendering’s variance in tone feels true to life. It’s sometimes quiet, sometimes deafening, and always complex. Whatever the volume, there are always possibilities for suffocation but also for beauty and hope.”
— The Paris Review
“Written as a letter to her first child, the graphic novel expresses the pain and hardship of postpartum depression, pairing an honest, compelling voice with a measured, unaffected tone.”
— Broadly
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“Teresa Wong’s spare, lovely exploration of postpartum depression is compassionate and direct in all the right ways and, most importantly, locates the thread of joy that runs through a life — even if, in our most despairing hours or days or weeks, it seems as though it’s been lost to us forever.”
— Emily Flake, New Yorker cartoonist and author of Mama Tried
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“This book is so important — it’s like a friend reaching through the darkness and telling your own story back to you. It’s universal and heartbreaking and so, so reassuring.”
— Lucy Knisley, author of Kid Gloves
“Full to bursting with sadness, insight and hope.”
— Tom Hart, author of Rosalie Lightning
“In a society where women’s stories of childbirth and early motherhood are expected to be either fairy tales or else not told at all, Dear Scarlet is an act of bravery.”
— Sarah Glidden, author of Rolling Blackouts